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Guide to the Santa Cruz County (Calif.) Government Records Collection (1850s – Present)
County Clerk (1866 – 1976)

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Per Wikipedia the clerk often serves as the official keeper of the municipal records, and as such, is sometimes described as the “historian” of the community. Sometimes the Clerk’s Office is limited to just presenting the agenda and minutes for the legislative and committee meetings.  Clerks may also be responsible for issuing licenses, overseeing local elections, maintain financial records, registrar of vital statistics, and increasingly, for assuring the transparency of the municipality’s conduct of business.

ARRANGEMENT

SERIES I.  CANDIDATE STATEMENTS – RECORD OF INCOME AND EXPENSES FOR CANDIDATES (1894 – 1956)

SERIES II.  BURIAL PERMITS (1897 – 1914)

SERIES III.  VOTER REGISTRATION (1866 – 1976)

SERIES IV.  NATURALIZATION RECORDS (1871 – 1927)

Subseries IV.A.  Declaration of Intention
Subseries IV.B.  Petition and Record of Naturalization
Subseries IV.C.  Naturalization Citizenship Certificates

SERIES V.  MARRIAGE APPLICATIONS (1900 – 1975)

CONTENTS

SERIES I.  CANDIDATE STATEMENTS – RECORD OF INCOME AND EXPENSES FOR CANDIDATES (1894 – 1956)

One (1) Ledger plus eight (8) boxes

Series Scope and Content Summary

This series contains the ledger for the income and expenses of political candidates.  In 1893, the California State Legislature enacted a law entitled “Purity of Elections” based on an English statute that had been passed ten years earlier. The California law covered every aspect of election corruption then of concern, including bribery, coercion, fraud, and secret financing of campaigns. Provisions of the Purity of Elections law included requirements that candidates and their committees file with the Secretary of State detailed financial statements disclosing campaign receipts and expenditures.

In 1911, as part of the Progressive reform movement in California, the initiative, referendum, and recall were added to the State Constitution. Consequently, ballot measures began to play an increasing role in the creation of public policy. However, proposition campaigns were not covered by the Purity of Elections law. So, in 1921, legislation was enacted to require financial disclosure by organizations supporting or opposing statewide propositions.  There are nine (9) boxes containing candidate statements from 1894 – 1956.  There is also a ledger that covers the period of 1926 to 1934.

– Candidate Statements, 1894-1896
– Candidate Statements, 1898-1908
– Candidate Statements, 1902-1905
– Candidate Statements, 1905-1912
– Candidate Statements, 1908-1912
– Candidate Statements, 1912-1918
– Candidate Statements, 1918-1930
– Candidate Statements, 1926-1948
– Candidate Statements, 1940-1956

SERIES II.  BURIAL PERMITS (1897 – 1914)

One (1) Box

Series Scope and Content Summary

This series contains the Form 132’s Santa Cruz County Registrar’s Burial Permits, the Form 10’s Stet Board of Health Permit for Burial or Removal, and the ledger for Removal Certificates. More definite rules for the registration of deaths were adopted in a statute approved March 18, 1905. This act gave to the State Bureau of Vital Statistics the general supervision of the records of death.  In that they were to be assisted by local registrars, the city clerk or recorder in incorporated cities and towns, and the county recorder in the district lying outside of the incorporated municipalities.  No Burial Permit was to be issued until after the return of a satisfactory certificate of death.  This certificate must be of standard form recommended by the United States census office and the American Public Health Association and must contain information as to the exact time and place of death; the name, sex, race and color of the deceased; whether married, single or widowed; date and place of birth; name and birthplace of the father; maiden name and birthplace of the mother; and the occupation of the deceased.  Other items regarding the cause of death, place of burial, etc.., are to be supplied by the physician and undertaker.  The local registrar is required to make a complete and accurate copy of each certificate upon a form identical with the original certificate, this copy to be filed in his office as the local record of such death.  The original certificate is then sent on to the state office.  In 1907 further amendments were made in regard to the registration of deaths, but none of these affected the method or form of the records as above described. These forms provide information such as the person’s name, sex, age, date of death, who their doctor was plus more:

Link to Spreadsheet with Burial-Permits currently maintained at the Santa Cruz MAH (21 May 2014).  If you notice any errors entered on this spreadsheet please let the museum staff know so they can be corrected.  During the transcribing of this information the following was identified:

–  These permits appear to be just for individuals buried in cemeteries in northern Santa Cruz County.  None of the cemeteries for the south county are included – currently not aware where the permits for the south county are maintained.

–  For the majority of individuals who died outside of the county when their remains were transferred the document only stated Santa Cruz.  No cemetery was identified.

–  For some people who died in Santa Cruz their remains were transferred to San Mateo and then back to Santa Cruz.

Box ID#: Folder ID#

6:X

SERIES III.  VOTER REGISTRATION (1866 – 1976)

Series Scope and Content Summary

Great Registers are compiled lists of registered voters that included such information as birth dates, naturalization dates, address and occupation. According to Jim Faulkinbury: “The earliest Great Registers were produced in 1866 as a result of the enactment of Chapter CCLXV, Laws of the 16th Session of the California State Legislature; 1865-66. … This legislation, approved 19 March 1866, and known as the Registration Act provided ‘for the registration of the citizens of the State, and for the enrollment in the several election districts of all the legal voters thereof, and for the prevention and punishment of frauds affecting the elective franchise.’”  Please note that women were given the right to vote in 1911 in California, and first appear in the 1912 registers.

Great Register 1894 Register2

– Great Register – 1866-1874
– Great Register – 1875-1879
– Great Register – 1880-1886 (cloth cover is loose)
– Great Register – 1888-1890, Volume 1, A-L
– Great Register – 1888-1890, Volume 2, M-Z
– Great Register – 1888-1890, Volume 3, Supplement

Stanley Stevens in 2010 compiled the information in the Great Register to act as a substitute for the 1890 census.  The following pdf files are the result of this project.

Link to pdf Document by Stanley Stevens 1890 Introduction
Link to pdf Document of entire Transcribed 1890 Database PDF
Link to Spreadsheet of entire Transcribed 1890 Great Register
Link to 1890 GR Appendix A Names of Precincts
Link to 1890 GR Appendix B Legal Notices
Link to 1890 GR Appendix C News Items
Link to 1890 GR Table 1 Precinct Totals
Link to 1890 GR Table 2 Registrants by Birth Place
Link to 1890 GR Table 3 Registrants by Occupation

– Great Register – 1892-1896, L-Z
– Great Register – 1892-1896, A-K
– Great Register – 1896-1899, A-K
– Great Register – 1896-1899, L-Z
– Great Register – 1898-1899
– Great Register – 1900-1901, Volume 1, A-L
– Great Register – 1900-1901, Volume 2, M-Z
– Great Register – 1902, A-K
– Great Register – 1902, L-Z
– Great Register – 1904-1905, Volume 1, A-L
– Great Register – 1904-1905, Volume 2, M-Z
– Great Register – 1906-1907, Volume 1, A-L
– Great Register – 1906-1907, Volume 2, M-Z
– Great Register – 1908-1909, Volume 1, A-L
– Great Register – 1908-1909, Volume 2, M-Z
– Index to Great Register – 1900
– Partial Reprint of Great Register, 1892-1894, Daubenbis – Uren
– Reprint of Great Register – 1888
– Index to Great Register – 1900
– Index to Great Register – 1902
– Index to Great Register – 1904
– Index to Great Register – 1906
– Index to Great Register – 1908
– Index to Great Register – 1910
– Index to Great Register, Alphabetical – 1910
– Index to Great Register – 1910
– Index to Great Register – 1912
– Index to Great Register – 1912
– Index to Great Register – 1916
– Index to Great Register – 1916-1917
– Index to Great Register – 1918
– Index to Great Register – 1920
– Index to Great Register – 1920
– Index to Great Register – 1922
– Index to Great Register – 1924
– Index to Great Register – 1926
– Index to Great Register – 1928
– Index to Great Register – 1930

1930 Index to Great Register – First Supervisory District

– Index to Great Register – 1932

1932 Index to Great Register – First Supervisory District

– Index to Great Register – 1934
– Index to Great Register – 1936
– Index to Great Register – 1938
– Index to Great Register – 1940
– Index to Great Register – 1940
– Index to Great Register – 1940, Watsonville #17
– Index to Great Register – 1942
– Index to Great Register – 1942
– Index to Great Register – 1944
– Index to Great Register – 1944
– Index to Great Register – 1946
– Index to Great Register – 1946
– Index to Great Register – 1948
– Index to Great Register – 1948
– Index to Great Register – 1950
– Index to Great Register – 1950
– Index to Great Register – 1952 (Office Copy)
– Index to Great Register – 1952
– Index to Great Register – 1954 (Office Copy)
– Index to Great Register – 1954
– Index to Great Register – 1956 (Office Copy)
– Index to Great Register – 1956, Amesti – San Lorenzo
– Index to Great Register – 1956, Santa Cruz – Zayante
– Index to Great Register – 1958 (Office Copy)
– Index to Great Register – 1958, Amesti – San Lorenzo
– Index to Great Register – 1958, Santa Cruz – Zayante
– Index to Great Register – 1960 (Office Copy)
– Index to Great Register – 1960, Amesti – San Lorenzo
– Index to Great Register – 1960, Santa Cruz – Zayante
– Index to Great Register – 1962, Precincts 1001 – 2207
– Index to Great Register – 1962, Precincts 3001 – 5107
– Index to Great Register – June 1964
– Index to Great Register – November 1964
– Index to Great Register – 1964
– Index to Great Register – 1964
– Index to Great Register – 1964
– Index to Great Register – 1966
– Index to Great Register – 1968
– Index to Great Register – 1968
– Index to Great Register – 1970
– Index to Great Register – 7 November 1972, 1st Supervisorial District
– Index to Great Register – 7 November 1972, 2nd Supervisorial District
– Index to Great Register – 7 November 1972, 3rd Supervisorial District
– Index to Great Register – 7 November 1972, 4th Supervisorial District
– Index to Great Register – 7 November 1972, 5th Supervisorial District
– Index to Great Register – 5 November 1974, Precincts 5023 – 5406
– Index to Great Register San Lorenzo Valley – 5 November 1974, Alphabetical
– Index to Great Register San Lorenzo Valley – 5 November 1974, Precincts 1001-1031
– Index to Great Register San Lorenzo Valley – 5 November 1974, Precincts 1101-2028
– Index to Great Register San Lorenzo Valley – 5 November 1974, Precincts 2201-3113
– Index to Great Register San Lorenzo Valley – 5 November 1974, Precincts 3114-3136
– Index to Great Register San Lorenzo Valley – 5 November 1974, Precincts 4001-4315
– Index to Great Register – 2 November 1976, 1st Supervisorial District, Precincts 1001 – 1401
– Index to Great Register – 2 November 1976, 2nd Supervisorial District, Precincts 2001 – 2211
– Index to Great Register – 2 November 1976, 3rd Supervisorial District, Precincts 3001 – 3141
– Index to Great Register – 2 November 1976, 4th Supervisorial District, Precincts 4001 – 4318
– Index to Great Register – 2 November 1976, 5th Supervisorial District, Precincts 5001 – 5499

SERIES IV.  NATURALIZATION RECORDS (1871 – 1927)

Series Scope and Content Summary

People applying to become citizens must satisfy certain requirements. For example, there have been requirements for applicants to have lived in the nation for five years (three if married to a U.S. citizen,) be of “good moral character” meaning no felony convictions, be of “sound mind” in the judgment of immigration officials, have knowledge of the Constitution, and be able to speak and understand English unless they are elderly or disabled.  Applicants must also pass a simple citizenship test.  Up until recently, a test published by the Immigration and Naturalization Service asked questions such as “How many stars are there in our flag?” and “What is the Constitution?” and “Who is the president of the United States today?”  At one point, the Government Printing Office sold flashcards for $8.50 to help test takers prepare for the test.

This series is divided into three (3) subseries:

Subseries IV.A.  Declaration of Intent
Subseries IV.B.  Petition and Record of Naturalization
Subseries IV.C.  Naturalization Citizenship Certificates

Subseries IV.A.  Declaration of Intention

Subseries Scope and Content Summary

This subseries contains the Declaration of Intention for individuals wanting to become naturalized US Citizens.  Naturalization was a two-step process that generally took a minimum of 5 years. In general, after living in the United States for 2 years, an alien could file a Declaration of Intention (also called First Papers) to become a citizen.  Information found on this Declaration of Intention includes: Name, age, occupation, physical description, place and date of birth, current residence, how he immigrated from Canada to USA, his ports of arrival and departure, date of immigration, marital status, name of wife, original signature

– 1880-1890
– 1890-1906
– 1906-1909
– 1909-1911
– 1911-1913
– 1913-1918
– 1918-1922
– 1922-1927

Subseries IV.B.  Petition and Record of Naturalization

Subseries Scope and Content Summary

This subseries contains the Petition and record of Naturalization including any supporting documentation (declaration of intention, witness statements, affidavits, etc.).  After 2 additional years, the alien could Petition for Naturalization. After the petition was granted, a Certificate of Citizenship was issued to the alien.

– 1870s – binding is coming loose
– 1903-1906
– 1909-1913
– 1913-1916
– 1916-1920
– 1920-1923
– 1923-1927

Subseries IV.C.  Naturalization Citizenship Certificates

Subseries Scope and Content Summary

This subseries contains certificate of citizenship which is a legal document that serves as a proof of U.S. citizenship.

– 1884-1896
– 1888-1902
– 1898-1903

SERIES V.  MARRIAGE APPLICATIONS (1900 – 1975)

Series Scope and Content Summary

In general, a marriage license application includes similar information in most states. While the state required records be kept on marriage certificates and contracts as early as 1851, it wasn’t until 1858 that any further information was kept, such as births, divorce and death. At that time the office of the state Registrar was created. The requirements are also generally the same for both the potential bride and the potential groom.  The information requested include full name, age, address, mother’s maiden name, and previous marriages.

marriage

– Affidavits for Marriage License Register, 17 September 1900 – 12 October 1907
– Affidavits for Marriage License Register, 3 August 1905 – 9 April 1907
– Affidavits for Marriage License Register, 14 October 1907 – 4 September 1912
– Affidavits for Marriage License Register, 7 September 1912 – 20 April 1917
– Affidavits for Marriage License Register, 20 April 1917 – 25 August 1920
– Affidavits for Marriage License Register, 27 August 1920 – 2 July 1923
– Marriage Applications, 1 August 1927 – 17 October 1929
– Marriage Applications, 1929
– Marriage Applications, 1933
– Marriage Applications, 1946
– Marriage Applications, 1947
– Marriage Applications, 1948
– Marriage Applications, 1949
– Marriage Applications, 1950
– Marriage Applications, 1951
– Marriage Applications, 1952
– Marriage Applications, 1953
– Marriage Applications, 1954
– Marriage Applications, 1955
– Marriage Applications, 1956
– Marriage Applications, 1957
– Marriage Applications, 1958
– Marriage Applications, 1959
– Marriage Applications, 1960
– Marriage Applications, 1961
– Marriage Applications, 1962
– Marriage Applications, 1963
– Marriage Applications, 1965, A-L
– Marriage Applications, 1965, L-Z
– Marriage Applications, 1966, A-J
– Marriage Applications, 1966, K-Z
– Marriage Applications, 1967, A-K
– Marriage Applications, 1967, L-Z
– Marriage Applications, 1968, A-K
– Marriage Applications, 1968, L-Z
– Marriage Applications, 1969, A-K
– Marriage Applications, 1969, L-Z
– Marriage Applications, 1970, A-K
– Marriage Applications, 1970, L-Z
– Marriage Applications, 1971, A-K
– Marriage Applications, 1971, L-Z
– Marriage Applications, 1972, A-L
– Marriage Applications, 1972, M-Z
– Marriage Applications, 1973, A-F
– Marriage Applications, 1973, G-N
– Marriage Applications, 1973, O-Z
– Marriage Applications, 1974, A-G
– Marriage Applications, 1974, H-O
– Marriage Applications, 1974, P-Z
– Marriage Applications, 1975, A-G
– Marriage Applications, 1975, H-O
– Marriage Applications, 1975, P-Z

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